December 20, 2014 | Incorporating the Inter-Island News
Column

Sometimes, a whisper is more powerful than a scream

by Benjamin Stevens October 25, 2013
State of Maine.
All through the summer and the week of preparation we had on campus, I wondered and thought about how to go about getting in someone%u2019s face and yell. Read More
Column

The why and how of the Merchant Marine

From high school to the high seas, leadership is what makes the difference

by Benjamin Stevens September 30, 2013
Shipping in Searsport.
Since the war -- and in ages past -- the vast majority of the world's cargo moves by sea. Read More
Column

Those pre-school projects

Once a student at MMA, summer isn't a vacation

by Benjamin Stevens September 26, 2013
State of Maine
The season doesn't change my interests. Summertime doesn't change the fact that I always want to find ways to be a better officer and leader, be a stronger person, physically and spiritually and mentally, and feel a little pride for my academy. Read More
Column

Leaders are made... if they follow this advice

Bigger, better and stronger; delegate, be unspecific

by Benjamin Stevens August 15, 2013
State of Maine, Bowdoin
There are hundreds of lessons, both broad and specific, to be learned from those who have been leaders for a long time. These people are still learning from each other and from us—which is the true beauty of leadership. Read More
Column

Today's pirates are no Jack Sparrow

by Benjamin Stevens July 8, 2013
Vessel security officer training is part of the curriculum for juniors on the State of Maine cruise. Chaz Kulow (in the gray camouflage) was our security training officer

this year. PHOTO: BENJAMIN STEVENS
We discussed some of the many ways to smuggle armaments aboard a ship, particularly when there is no metal detector to help out. A photographer might keep the barrel of a rifle in his tripod bag, and it would look like a tripod leg to the watchman searching the bag. He might also keep his sniping scope in a lens case, and the security guard would see only a camera lens. Read More
Column

Training ourselves to solve problems

by Benjamin Stevens July 2, 2013
The State of Maine in Castine.
Capt. Gandy, our commandant, relies on the regimental commander to not come to him saying, "I have a problem today, sir," but to come to him saying, "A problem came up, and these are the measures I and my staff are taking to solve it, sir." Read More
Column

In memoriam: At rest with the waves and wind

Maine Maritime staffer buried at sea

by Benjamin Stevens June 26, 2013
Burial at sea.
The opportunity to pay respects to our men and women in uniform who go to sea or to war arises often for those of us wearing a uniform, even if it is only a quasi-military dress we wear. Each time somebody in public sees a Maine Maritime student, they see the uniform first, and we are taught to treat appearance and bearing with utmost respect, keeping in mind our uniformed predecessors. Read More
Column

Murphy's law ends MMA voyage

Kidney infection sends midshipman to hospital

by Benjamin Stevens June 18, 2013
Benjamin Stevens aboard the State of Maine.
Health is all important in the industry. If your potential boss learns you have a health problem such as epilepsy or anemia or something that could affect your safety at sea, he is less likely to hire you; after all, there is no hospital nearby when you are at sea. Read More
Column

Sea stories, including a close encounter with a manatee

by Benjamin Stevens June 6, 2013
Then something else happened to distract him, and he stopped pulling entirely. The lines began to sink down to the rotating propellor, and if they had snagged, the midshipman would have been snapped up by the line on the deck and sucked into the propellor. Read More
Column

Working aboard the ship may be mundane, but never routine

Cadets must learn everything from engine parts to garbage disposal

by Benjamin Stevens May 30, 2013
Midshipman Gilman making a Chinese Stopper. When putting the ship up to the dock, we winch in the lines to get the right tension. Then, in order to maintain tension while we tie off, we tie another line called a stopper onto the dock line to hold it
Utility is the low point for everybody on the ship. This is the rotation of cleaning toilets and waxing decks. We deal with things like garbage and waste management in utility, and it is very important to do, just like everything else. Read More
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